April 23, 2014

SF 702 Security Container Check Sheet

What is the Standard Form (SF) 702 Security Container Check Sheet?
  
If you deal with security containers (a.k.a. safes), you will likely need to deal with a SF 702. You post one for each container in a conspicuous location on the outside of the GSA approved container, vault door, or secure room. It is used to record who opens the container, closes the container, and does the check at the end of the day.

DoD Manual 5200.01, Vol. 3 mandates all Department of Defense services and agencies use the SF 702 to record security checks of all vaults, secure rooms, and safes. The SF 702 assists security officials with assessing container maintenance requirements based on usage, as well as help with security incident investigations. Also it is an inspectable item that you should get in the habit of filling out. It really isn't difficult to do once you know what is expected. If you remember the five points in the SF 702 Instructions you will be filling it like a pro in no time.
security container check sheet
How to fill out an SF 702 Security Container Check Sheet.
If you use a SF 702, then you will likely need a SF 701 as well. Check out our SF 701 Instructions post.

14 comments:

  1. A technicality should be pointed out here. The paragraph, above, omits used "for storing classified material". It is possible you have a security container that has no classified therein. Is an SF 702 still required? Perhaps, but, strictly speaking, not necessarily, unless mandated by other guidance or an SOP.

    What is particularly maddening is the "Checked By" column. If you are the last person in the office or building and you close your container, may (or must) you also enter your initials and the time in the Checked By column as well? Security guidance just needs to come out and say it once and for all. Discussions over the SF702 can be so draining. Some inspectors are not satisfied if you write "N/O" and demand you spell out "NOT OPENED", even though I can not find that mandated in any guidance in my agency.

    Some also complain if you use the entire SF702, which means you may have more than one month on the same form.

    I've never seen such wasted energy (and professional arguments) over a form such as the SF702. It's time agency regulations provide more details and guidance once and for all.

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    1. First think you for stopping and by commenting. I really do appreciate your feedback. You are correct in pointing out I based this general guidance off of storage of classified material policy. Most Department of Defense agencies require safes to have a SF 702 if it is securing arms, ammunition, and explosives (AA&E); keys for certain AA&E keys; and money. These requirements are listed in the physical security program regulations.

      I feel your pain with the inconsistency of inspectors and their nit-picking of the SF 702. I've been on the receiving end of this so many times that I've lost count. Based upon my experience, your more inexperienced inspectors going strictly by checklists are the ones that like to over analyze the SF 702 (and they all are convinced their way is the correct way). I just say "thank you," and focus energy on more pressing matters. The more seasoned inspector are more concerned with you meeting the intent of policy and guidance. The whole point of the form is to assist security officials with assessing container use and security incident investigations.

      Besides, if the worst thing they can find is they don't like the way the SF 702 is filled out, than you have a solid security program!

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  2. Question: We have a separate secure room within our SCIF, all of our analysts has been granted access to the room. It has a spin dial and card reader for access. Are we required to secure this room daily i.e. spinning the dial? If not how would it be annotated on the 702?

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    1. I'd say check out the ICD 705 Tech Specs (V1.3, September 2015). If this room is a "compartmented area", then the CDX-09 (or other approved lock) is not only not required, but I believe the ICD 705 Tech Specs guidance specifically forbids it.

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  3. I'm looking for something that is showing how each box should be filled out. for example, The "To" and "THRU" boxes. The "FROM" box. Also, is there some place that explicitly states that the forms can only be used for just one month? what if I still have space left and I go into a new month? How should the "MONTH/YEAR" be completed on one column if I'm wanting to start a new month? There seems to be a big debate here in the office and I'm just trying to get some clarification on this document. Just wanting to "dot my i's and cross my t's" if you know what I mean.

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  5. Bump. I am in the process of evaluating these processes in my own department. Like the OP, there seems to be a lack of guidance regarding the "book answer" on how to fill out this form. If anyone can produce this document, would be much appreciated.

    In the absence of this guidance, I would recommend the following course of action:
    1. Contact your Supervisory Agency/Inspector and find out how they want you to fill it out.
    2. Establish procedures in your Local Policy Manual for how YOU are going to fill it out.
    3. Because Commanding Officers/Installation Leaders are ultimately responsible for their security measures:
    TO: CO/Person in Charge
    THRU: Security Manager
    From: Department in which the security is located/belongs to
    New month = New sheet.

    Once again, this is just from my own experience as a manager in several commands, not out of the book ;)

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    1. I must say, in over 25 years of federal service, I have (1) never seen the "TO, THRU, FROM" portions completed and accordingly (2) never filled in those blocks myself. Inspectors can be flaky, but not one has ever pointed that out. They are more worried about writing "NOT OPENED" vs "N/O" or just a line for an unopened security container for the day.

      Having said that, your recommendations are good ones. We have also implemented a policy on how to fill out the SF 702. What annoys me no end is having an inspector saying what a "horrible" job we are doing filling out the SF 702s, but this same inspector has absolutely no policies to supplement higher regulations/instructions.

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  6. how long is a 702 kept, if so do you know the AR for this information

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    1. AR 380-5. For SCIFs/SAPFs, it is 90 days.

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    2. I forgot to add that you should see JB Mger's comment, above, from 7 August 2014, as there may be different requirements for storing AA&E-related items (see AR 190-series regs), money (DoD Financial Mgmt Regulation, Vol 5, Chapter 3) and urinalysis items (see AR 600-85, Appendix E).

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  7. Just my .2 cents...the TO and THRU blocks have "if required" in parenthesis so I have never filled it out nor have I had an inspector even look at my 702's. The original form is double sided and my guess is it's for those containers that are opened many times during the month. My pet peeve with folks I work with is they will sometimes start a new form on the wrong column/wrong half (because form is usually folded) and your dates are hard to track. Maybe that's my OCD kicking in but in another words, I think the form should be started at the upper left as the first day of the month.

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  8. .2 cents is $0.002! (and here I thought you had OCD, LOL).

    I can't get too worked up over left side or right side of the SF 702 as long as it is filled out completely and correctly (to include MONTH/YEAR, Container Number, etc.).

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  9. Actually it's 2¢ or $.02 just saying

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